What Is the Difference Between Part 107 and Part 61

What Is the Difference Between Part 107 and Part 61?

In the intricate landscape of aviation regulation, understanding the distinctions between Part 107 and Part 61 is crucial for pilots navigating their certification pathways.

This article delineates the scope, applicability, and key distinctions between these parts, clarifying their impact on pilot training and certification.

Summary – What Is the Difference Between Part 107 and Part 61?

The difference between Part 107 and Part 61 lies in the type of aviation they regulate and the certification process. Part 107 is a set of rules for operating small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) or drones commercially, while Part 61 outlines the criteria for certification of manned aircraft pilots and instructors.

We will also explore how these regulations specifically address drones, and their implications for both commercial and recreational aviation.

Simplified and direct, our comparison aims to demystify these critical regulatory frameworks.

everything to pass drone

What are Part 107 and Part 61

Part 107 delineates a specific set of regulations for the operation of small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), whereas Part 61 specifies the criteria for certification of manned aircraft pilots and instructors.

To put it simply, Part 107 is the rule book for flying drones commercially. It outlines what drone pilots must do to fly safely and legally.

For instance, they must keep the drone within their line of sight and avoid flying directly over people who aren’t involved in the drone’s operation.

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On the other hand, Part 61 is like a guide for those who want to become certified to fly manned aircraft. It lays out all the steps a person needs to take to earn a pilot’s license.

This includes passing tests that show they know how the aircraft works and how to handle it in different situations. It also requires that pilots meet certain health standards to ensure they are fit to fly.

In essence, both Part 107 and Part 61 are about keeping the skies safe.

Part 107 focuses on the smaller, unmanned drones, while Part 61 deals with larger, manned aircraft and the people who fly them.

everything to pass drone

Scope and Applicability Differences

The scope and applicability of Part 107 and Part 61 diverge significantly, with the former governing commercial and governmental drone operations and the latter setting forth the certification process for manned aircraft pilots and instructors.

Part 107 focuses on small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) and stipulates that operators must maintain visual line of sight requirements with their drones.

This ensures that drone pilots can see their aircraft throughout the flight to manage risks and prevent collisions.

On the contrary, Part 61 pertains to individuals seeking to become certified pilots of manned aircraft.

This regulation encompasses the training requirements essential for flying traditional aircraft, which are more comprehensive and intricate than those for drones.

It includes a thorough evaluation of an individual’s aeronautical knowledge and flight proficiency, ensuring that pilots are well-prepared for a wide range of flight scenarios.

Moreover, Part 61 outlines specific medical standards that manned aircraft pilots must meet to ensure they are fit to fly safely.

These medical requirements are not a component of Part 107 since drone operations do not carry the same risks to the operator’s health and safety as piloting a manned aircraft does.

Woman passing drone test

Key Requirements and Qualifications Compared

When comparing the key requirements and qualifications, one can discern that Part 107 mandates a less stringent regulatory framework for drone operators than Part 61 does for manned aircraft pilots.

Specifically, Part 107 does not require the same depth of aeronautical knowledge or the extensive training hours that Part 61 mandates for traditional pilots.

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Under Part 107, individuals must pass the initial aeronautical knowledge exam, the Unmanned Aircraft General – Small (UAG), without the need for a specific number of training hours.

In contrast, Part 61 details a more comprehensive syllabus for aspiring manned aircraft pilots, including mandatory flight-hour minimums that cover diverse flight conditions and operations.

These pilots must complete dual, solo, and night flights before they are eligible for licensure.

Additionally, medical standards are more rigorous under Part 61, requiring pilots to undergo aeromedical evaluations to ensure fitness for flying.

Language proficiency is critical for both, but the context differs.

While Part 107 operators must be able to understand English to communicate for drone operation safety, Part 61 pilots need this proficiency to communicate effectively in the airspace system with air traffic control and other pilots.

Practicing Flying A Drone For Part 107

Impact on Pilot Training and Certification

Understanding these regulatory frameworks’ distinct requirements, it becomes evident that the impact on pilot training and certification varies significantly between Part 107 and Part 61.

Under Part 107, pilots aiming to operate small drones must undergo training that is specialized for unmanned aircraft systems.

The training methods involve learning the specifics of drone operations, airspace regulations, and safety practices.

Testing requirements include passing the initial aeronautical knowledge exam, and pilots must also complete online recurrent training every two years to ensure recency of knowledge.

Part 61, on the other hand, requires a more comprehensive approach to pilot training for manned aircraft. Training methods are extensive and include both ground school and actual flight experience.

Testing requirements are more rigorous, encompassing written exams, oral tests, and practical flight tests to demonstrate flight proficiency.

Part 61 also mandates that pilots meet medical standards by passing a medical examination, which is not required for Part 107 certification.

Part 107 drone pilot taking thoery test

Treatment of Drones in Regulations

Federal Aviation Regulations’ treatment of drones differentiates sharply between Part 107, which governs small unmanned aircraft systems exclusively, and Part 61, which primarily addresses manned aviation yet accommodates drone operation for certified pilots through additional training.

Safety considerations are central to both parts, ensuring that drone operations do not pose risks to people, property, or other aircraft.

Part 107 sets clear operational limitations for drones such as weight restrictions and requirements to keep drones within visual line of sight.

These rules are meant to minimize hazards and integrate drones safely into the national airspace.

Pilots have defined responsibilities, such as avoiding flying directly over people and not operating from a moving vehicle, to maintain control and safety at all times.

For Part 61 pilots, the transition to drone operation under Part 107 involves targeted online training. This approach acknowledges their existing aviation knowledge while adding enforcement measures specific to drones.

Both parts aim to harmonize the integration with airspace, ensuring that all forms of aviation, manned or unmanned, can coexist and operate efficiently without compromising safety or operational integrity.

manual part of drone test

Commercial and Recreational Aviation Implications?

The implications of Parts 107 and 61 for commercial and recreational aviation are significant, as they delineate distinct operational frameworks and certification requirements for pilots in each domain.

For those flying drones commercially, Part 107 is the main guideline. This part sets the key requirements, like passing a knowledge test for a Remote Pilot Certificate.

It defines how commercial drone pilots should operate, such as keeping the drone in sight and flying during specific hours unless a waiver is granted.

Part 61, however, applies to manned aircraft and impacts pilot training and certification quite differently. It lays out what’s needed to earn various pilot certificates, with a focus on traditional aircraft.

Recreational flyers, while generally following Part 107, have more freedom if they’re flying for fun. They must pass the Recreational UAS Safety Test and follow basic rules.

When comparing Part 107 and Part 61 differences, it’s clear the scope and applicability differ greatly. Part 107 is tailored for modern UAS operations, while Part 61 is for established aviation practices.

This impacts pilots because the path to certification under each part varies, affecting both the training process and the qualifications they must meet.

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Conclusion

In summary, Part 107 and Part 61 are distinct regulatory frameworks governing different aviation operations.

Part 107 specifically addresses commercial drone operations, offering a streamlined certification process tailored to unmanned aircraft.

In contrast, Part 61 outlines certification requirements for manned aircraft pilots, emphasizing comprehensive training and diverse flight experience.

Understanding these regulations is vital for aspiring pilots, as it directs their training pathways and defines operational limitations for both commercial and recreational aviation endeavors.

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